• ALOE COOL GEL contains aloe-vera, tea tree oil, menthol and camphor. Its cooling and soothing action provides quick relief to tired tendons and muscles. It also stimulates the local circulation, dispersing minor swellings and bruises. Its cooling action is beneficial when used as a pre-competition liniment. It has an anti-bacterial action so can be applied over minor grazes and scratches.

    When applying to the legs, prepare area by cleaning and drying thoroughly, use a liberal amount and cover the entire area between the elbow and fetlock joints. Massage in well for 4-5 minutes. Take care if applying bandages over the top of ALOE COOL GEL; sensitive skin may blister. When using on the body, prepare area by cleaning and drying thoroughly, apply liberally over the muscles, massaging firmly in the direction of the coat hair. Repeat as necessary.

    Contains no prohibited substances.

    Available in 500ml size only

    View our 'Horses do get Hot' Article Here...

    BASIC MASSAGE TECHNIQUE: BODY: Using palms and fingers massage firmly concentrating on the areas outlined in the diagram. Where the direction of the hair coat allows, massage towards the heart (aids venous circulation).Continue for 5 – 10 minutes. LEGS: Using the palms and fingers, massage from the elbow to the knee and then from the knee to fetlock. The direction of the hair coat makes it easier to massage downwards. Concentrate on the bulbs of the heels for 5 minutes to stimulate the venous circulation.

  • Nasal-Eze is an effective product for horses showing  upper respiratory tract problems. It is a 100% natural product and contains Menthol and four volatile oils in an anhydrous base. The Menthol gives a cooling sensation to irritated nasal membranes and also helps clear the airways and bronchial passages. Eucalyptus Oil is a useful expectorant, increasing the amount of respiratory secretions. Tee Tree Oil properties are well known. It is able to maintain its activity in the presence of nasal secretions. It also has a soothing action on the nasal membranes. Oil of Thyme contains Thymol known for its influence on spores. Pine Oil possesses mild antiseptic properties. These oils are formulated in a non-irritant anhydrous base that makes application to the inner nostril, easy and safe. A liberal amount should be applied twice daily to the base of each nostril. It is also useful to reduce the possibility of transfer whenever horses are exposed to other horses that have respiratory infections. It should be used before transportation and anytime a horse is exposed to dusty or spore condition.
    3 Horses Nasal-Eze is available in 250gm and 500gm sizes.
    Apply liberally to the base of each nostril, Before and after exercise Before transportation Any time the horse may be exposed to other horses, dust or spores
  • This is a nutriceutical supplement for horses that are involved in strenuous fast work, such as racing, eventing, hunting and active fast training where the horse may be asked for high speed sustained over a distance. It is of particular assistance to horses who are in recovery from an airways virus and returning to training. It is important to note that one of the initiating factors of the problem - is the airway infection or virus that may not have been detected early enough and the horse may not have been given sufficient rest or support therapy doing this time. As a result the immune system is reduced in efficiency and the capillaries weakened. Ongoing correct management after such and episode is important, such as dampening all feeds and wash hay, reducing dust, especially in the barn cleaning and bed changing – remove the horse when this is occurring. One of the key ingredients is called Rutin, this is natural substance derived from some plants and yields quercetin and rutinose It is used in many countries in human therapeutics as a vasoprotectant, assisting the strengthening of small capillaries which have become fragile and broken down. Literally its the pressure of the strenuous exercise creating a high air demand through the lungs, that cause the capillaries to breakdown and leak.  Horses that are roarers, even surgically adjusted, have a greater pressure build up and are therefore prone to this problem. There is limited science in equine applications but strong anecdotal evidence is such that this ingredient, especially when enhanced with Vitamin C, can assist in the recovery of horses to full performance levels, but also as a preventative to reduce the negative effects of high speed or prolonged strenuous work. The pressure created in the lungs under stress, can cause the capillary walls to break down. To be most effective it needs to be fed over a sustained period , ie all the time the horse is in work, and in conjunction with a more carefully prepared work schedule and a stable management regime to reduce any negative influences on the airways. Nutritional supplementation should be started prior to the horse starting training, whether from a rest turn out, or illness. Another factor in capillary weakness is a lowered immune system, so full levels of Vitamins A, D and C have been included in the product to assist an improvement with this vital aspect. Vitamin A can be deficient in horses on restricted green pasture, but fed predominately grain and hay instead. This is often the case with racing horses. Vitamin D is readily available to grazing animals exposed to daily sunlight, but again horses kept stabled or night grazed may have sub optimal levels which is negative to performance and the integral health of the horse. Vitamin C is well known for its anti-oxidant properties, reducing the damaging free radicals developed in the transfer of cellular energy. However its inclusion in the formula is also to enhance the effects of Rutin and assist horses in recovery from stress and illness. The product Rutin is a bioflavanoid and does not contravene racing regulations, neither does the level of Vitamins.
    Active ingredients per kg:             Rutin Powder 20,000 mg Vitamin A 833,350 iu Vitamin C 16,667 mg Vitamin D3 50,000 iu Calcium 145 gm Magnesium 113 gm
    Racehorses, Eventers: 60 gm (30gm twice daily)
    Suggestions for Standardbred Horses : For a horse suspected of the problem a re-think of the training regime is also a part of the solution. It is important to have a warm up of 10 minutes before work and a warm down after, more so in a cold environment. Swimming can stress the airway system, only swim as interval training for short bursts at a time with the same period rest to reduce the pressure until deep breathing is lowered, before another swim. It is the deep breathing that is important to avoid. Limit to two bursts of swimming. It is thought that not only is the breakdown caused by the lung pressure but is amplified by the concussive effect from a hard track. So it is preferable to train using slow long distance work in the initial 6-8 weeks working towards fast work. Only use short hit out half pace 200 metres (furlong), using a softer surface if possible. Only start full hit outs sprints for 200 metres (furlong), after a good warm up, then allow recovery before repeating, then the warm down. Avoid all out sustained work, it is important to reduce the time that full blood pressure is being created in the lungs and blood vessels.  Studies have shown that as long as the early slow conditioning work is carried out to create musculoskeletal strength and fitness, then the use of short sprints with a recovery period between will have the horse in a better condition to race or perform. Save the full demand for that day and then allow recovery and go back to slow work immediately after.  Observe the breathing of the horse closely in all training and racing and reduce the demand if it becomes stressed and allow recovery. It is the slow work and the recovery times, reducing the high demand work and feeding a support supplement that can help keep the performance of the horse up to a maximum.  Suggestions for Thoroughbred Horses & Eventers : It is important to have a warm up of 10 minutes before work and a warm down after, more so in a cold environment. Swimming can stress the airway system, only swim for short (60 sec) at a time with the same 60 second rest to reduce the pressure for 30 second s or until deep breathing is lowered, before another swim. It is the deep breathing that is important to avoid. Limit to two burst of swimming. It is thought that not only is the breakdown caused by the lung pressure but is amplified by the concussive effect from a hard track. So it is preferable to train using slow long distance work in the initial 6-8 weeks working towards a fast canter, but not a gallop. Only use short hit out half pace 400-500 metres, using a softer surface if possible. Only start full hit outs sprints for 300-400 metres , after a good warm up, then allow recovery before repeating, then the warm down. Avoid all out sustained work , it is important to reduce the time that full blood pressure is being created in the lungs and blood vessels.  Studies have shown that as long as the early slow conditioning work is carried out to create musculoskeletal strength and fitness, then the use of short sprints with a recovery period between will have the horse in a better condition to race or perform. Save the full demand for that day and then allow recovery and go back to slow work immediately after.  Observe the breathing of the horse closely in all training and racing and reduce the demand if it becomes stressed and allow recovery. It is the slow work and the recovery times, reducing the high demand work and feeding a support supplement that can help keep the performance of the horse up to a maximum.